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Feature Article: The First Solo

There are many self-induced stresses on the student prior to solo. The student begins to worry about it never happening, the cost, how others have done it sooner, and a thousand doubts. As a student your forget that the instructor wants you to solo, also. Flying as often as you can just prior to solo is a big help. Time spent getting appropriate dual is better use of time and money than scary solo.

A student can help his own situation by treating every pre-solo dual as though it were going to be a solo. Take responsibility for all communications and decisions. Make your own go-around decisions. By making your own decisions you will be able to show the instructor that you are ready to solo.

Before a student is endorsed for solo he must show both knowledge and compliance with FAR Part 91. He must have the required papers and endorsements of flight and ground training as required by FAR Part 61.87. Solo becomes possible only when the student is proficient. There is no time requirement nor should the student have misconceptions as to time producing proficiency.

Being proficient means that the student can fly the aircraft so as to stabilize climbs, level, and descents. He uses flaps and trim to secure optimum performance. While flying he is able to position the aircraft appropriately in the pattern and safely on the runway. He must understand and correctly respond to ATC communications. He can accommodate The proficient student has his priorities in order, i.e.; fly the plane, navigate, communicate. when in doubt, go around.

You and the instructor will know when you are ready for solo. On the 'day' you will fly three touch and go's or full stops (your option) and a go-around. If they go well the instructor will direct you to the base of the tower. The paper work will be completed. The instructor will go into the tower. You will proceed to the runway and make three touch and go's or full stop landings. Now taxi to the East ramp, it's over.

Soloing is one of those once-in-a-lifetime experiences that you will always remember. It is a milestone but the best is yet to come.

Your First Solo

There are many self-induced stresses on the student prior to solo. The student begins to worry about it never happening, the cost, how others have done it sooner, and a thousand doubts. As a student you forget that the instructor wants you to solo, also. Flying as often as you can just prior to solo is a big help. Time spent getting appropriate dual is better use of time and money than scary solo.

A student can help his own situation by treating every pre-solo dual as though it were going to be a solo. Take responsibility for all communications and decisions. Make your own go-around decisions. By making your own decisions you will be able to show the instructor that you are ready to solo.

Before a student is endorsed for solo he must show both knowledge and compliance with FAR Part 91. He must have the required papers and endorsements of flight and ground training as required by FAR Part 61.87. Solo becomes possible only when the student is proficient. There is no time requirement nor should the student have misconceptions as to time producing proficiency.

Being proficient means that the student can fly the aircraft so as to stabilize climbs, level, and descents. He uses flaps and trim to secure optimum performance. While flying he is able to position the aircraft appropriately in the pattern and safely on the runway. He must understand and correctly respond to ATC communications. He can accommodate The proficient student has his priorities in order, i.e.; fly the plane, navigate, communicate. when in doubt, go around.

You and the instructor will know when you are ready for solo. On the 'day' you will fly three touch and go's or full stops (your option) and a go-around. If they go well the instructor will direct you to the base of the tower. The paper work will be completed. The instructor will go into the tower. You will proceed to the runway and make three touch and go's or full stop landings. Now taxi to the East ramp, it's over.

Soloing is one of those once-in-a-lifetime experiences that you will always remember. It is a milestone but the best is yet to come.


Last Modified November 16, ©2018 TAGE.COM

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